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JEREMY LLOYD-STYLES

RGM INTRODUCING – WE INTERVIEW JEREMY LLOYD-STYLES WHAT HAPPENED?

Hiya Jeremy thanks for joining us in the virtual RGM lounge today, grab a brew and take a seat.

What made you decide that music is a thing for you?

When I saw my first concert the Winans with my mom and family. I couldn’t believe how incredibly loud it was. I was like “human beings are capable of this much noise? And everyone is ok with them being this loud??” I felt like what insects must have felt as they heard the thud of a Titanosaur. From then on I was like “I want to be the loud one”. 

Introduce us to you all and your musical history.

I used to be a sports dude, but then I discovered Oreos, Doritos, and sitting down, and that was the end of that. So I started getting more into playing guitar and reading comics. I started a band with my best friends and had a blast. Writing was fun, but so was laughing and apparently building forever memories. I got the songwriting and performing bug, got some encouragement from various important adults in my life, and decided to move to New York to make a go of it. I formed a band called Pearl and the Beard, and we did pretty well.

We played with some big names and toured the US, Canada, and England.  I was happy with our songs. I love Emily and Jocelyn (my old bandmates) as people and love seeing the world. That ended for various reasons. I wrote music for commercials for a bit, then got commissioned to write a musical with my old bandmate and decided to make an EP for shoots and googles. 

What was life like for you before music?

I’ve had various states of my life where I am not making music, and they are always pretty aimless. I think everyone needs some sort of arbitrary markers and goals to accomplish that’s just for them, and making music seems to be the one I enjoy the most.

What was the first song you heard that steered you into a music path?

I think hearing Weezer’s Only In Dreams got me more pumped than a WNBA basketball. I was like this is beautiful and powerful, and I want to make something like this. 

Where do you feel you currently sit within the music industry?

I probably sit where 95% of musicians currently sit and that is making songs, hoping some folks hear it, and trying to get better. 

What’s the biggest thing you have learned from someone else in the industry?

Funny thing I learned from Ice-T (yes from Law and Order) where he said everyone needs another hustle. He had to get into the acting game because he had a family. Music alone wasn’t enough to sustain him financially. That, and I was able to talk to David Salloway formerly of Saves the Day, and asked why he left the band. He said, “You do 10 years of anything, and you get pretty tired of it”. So I guess the thing that was helpful for me was offering me perspective on the reality of life as a musician. 

Tell us Two truths and a lie about you.

In no order: I have a half-sister who was born the same day and the same year I was. My pinky toes are the same size as my big toe. I’m allergic to walnuts. 

If you could wish for one thing to aid your career what would it be?

That the right person hears me at the right time and gives me that forever money. 

Do you ever worry about people taking things the wrong way or cancel culture? Discuss….

I think as a people/country/generation we’re in a period of growth. We’re trying on big adult pants, but we still have awkward teenage hips. We’re growing and trying to be better. It definitely has its hiccups, losses, misfires, and short-sightedness, but also some far far too late reckoning.  

One could argue no one gets canceled, that they just get scooped up by a group of right-wing trolls and paid handsomely for it. I do think my generation and pretty much everyone born before the Obama administration should serve as a giant flaming trash fire warning to the next generation of what not to do, and continue to try and grow.

I think it’s also important to understand we can hold two opposing views in our heads, and be able to talk. As long as you aren’t stepping on anyone’s toes, or grievously hurting them/traumatizing/taking advantage of them. If you do, apologize, hope to be forgiven, learn from it, and keep trying to be better. 

Do you sign up to any conspiracy theories? If not why not?

There was a brief period when I was a real 9/11 conspiracy guy, but as I have seen how government works and how loud-mouthed people are, that kind of coordination seems far too Herculean in effort. I do think the folks “in charge” are lazy opportunists, and sit and watch what will benefit them the most after it happens, but it doesn’t amount to any more than an athlete seeing an open hole and running through it. I do always enjoy talking to flat-earthers, though I don’t personally subscribe to it. 

What was the worst experience on stage?

Oh boy. So many bad moments. And alcohol was the number one reason for all of them. I had some times when I was a grump with my old bandmates, and I would slink into a funk. Like a child, rather than communicating. I also was in this other band and thought I was real rock and roll, real hot shit. We were playing and I needed some sound help. I saw the sound person wasn’t at the booth (probably for any myriad of reasons) and, while it was annoying, it was no reason for me to purposefully knock the mic stand over like a six-foot baby. 

Tell us something about you that you think people would be surprised about.

I can’t burp. 

What are the next steps you plan to take as an artist to reach the next level?

I firmly believe in just doing what makes you happy. That if you make stuff you enjoy, there will probably be someone out there who enjoys it as well. It may not be that many people, but as the internet has taught me, there are all sorts of groups waiting to be found and formed. I’ve spent far too many hours stressing about how to get to the next level when that goal post is always moving, and I have no control over it.  

We have noticed a lot of bands don’t use X (Twitter) why do you thing that is?

I’m actually on Twitter/X. I use it for writing stuff. I do dislike it.  I don’t have an Instagram. But I imagine it’s not the best place for sharing visual things, and as we all know, the best way to promote something is with big ol’ beautiful pictures with minimal words on them. 

I hear you have a new music, what can you tell us about it.

I did an exercise where I wanted to see if I could write a 90s-sounding song. I approached it like an artist would approach attempting an all-blue painting. What shades would I use to make something you can tell is something within this limited context? I did it, was pretty happy, played it for my wife and she was like “That sounds cool. You should write an album or something”, and then because of my limited capacity of resources/laziness settled on an EP. I just wrote and recorded the songs how I wanted, without any thought of what others might think. It was a great low-pressure exercise, and at the end of it, I had an EP. Not only that, but it was a secret gift for my wife since these songs are about her. 

What was the recording process like?

I have been getting better at producing, mixing, and recording. I have had to make demos for this musical I was commissioned to write, so I have this little setup in my apartment. It’s bare bones, just an impulse keyboard for sounds, drums, etc, and a Focusrite 2 plug-in where I do guitar, bass, and vocals. I pop my headphones on, and I am a secret recording machine. I am in a one-bedroom apartment with a 5-year-old and a wife who’s taking night classes, so I need to stay small and quiet in the evenings when I can record after I work my full-time job. It didn’t take too long to record this, like maybe 2 weeks total breaking it up bit by bit. 

What was the biggest learning curve in writing the new tunes?

Always production. Taking my time and figuring out the limited sonic landscape available to me. I had to be ok with breaking drums down piece by piece and having it sound weird at first. 

Would you change anything now it’s finished?

Probably, but you know what – this was a great snapshot of where I was when I recorded this. I’m ready to move on to my next EP and do that, take what I learned from this, and hopefully make it sound even better. 

Is there anything else you would like to share with the world?

More music in the future I hope!  

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