fbpx

RGM INTRODUCING – WE INTERVIEW LANCASHIRE DUO KIN TALA

What made you decide to start the band / become a soloist?

A joy of writing music, I guess. It’s an escape mechanism and a means of expression. To share that with others is just dead (really) rewarding. 

Introduce us all to the members and your musical history?

We’re a two-piece from North-West England, around Blackpool Lancashire. 

Shee and I (Dom) met in college in 2011/2012 and have been friends ever since. I’d written a few terrible indie rock songs, and Shee turned up with a friend of a friend at band practice and just transformed them into something workable. 

We began playing as our first moniker Don’t Start Fires in and around Blackpool and the Fylde Coast during a pretty lively time for the scene, especially for the area. We were the typical indie rock outfit that never really stood out, but we had big dreams and huge optimism that was difficult to realise with our circumstances growing up. 

We eventually went to separate universities across the country and couldn’t maintain our vision with the distance and the lack of funds, yet we always kept going behind the scenes, sending each other ideas, riffs and sounds.

KIN TALA was born out of that, a constant friendship and a momentum that built up over the years and transcended all the other things going on in our lives. It all culminated during the COVID lockdown, where finally, for the first time in 10 years, we actually had time to frame ourselves and our sound, to set our goals and begin to record. I spent about a month watching YouTube clips on production and forked out for all the equipment in my attic and we got to work.

We have set up RGM USA sharing USA music with the UK scene and vice versa, what are your thoughts on the UK music scene?

The range of outstanding UK artists and outfits is pretty inspiring at the moment. There seems to be this revolution of artists and bands that have started out of their bedrooms, and so many outfits have just exploded from nowhere. It’s exciting.

What support is out there for new artists in Blackpool?

BBC Introducing is a good one. We recently got a few plays for our upcoming single on the Lancashire channel, which was really humbling. MUSOSOUP has really helped us from a local perspective as well. Aside from that though, we’re a little hesitant to dive into any algorithmic shite that defines the industry at the moment. It’s actually depressing the lengths you would have to go through to get a like or a follow and then feel vindicated. We’re just gonna stick to the music and see what happens.

Who is inspiring you at the minute around your local unsigned scene?

We’re an absolute nightmare for defining influences because we tend to incorporate different styles, sounds, and instruments to different tracks at different times. But at the moment we’re really enjoying Saint Jude, Porij, Yves Tumor, and Sport’s Team. Definitely check them out.

What’s pissing you off at the moment?

Tory-sleaze. 

Tell us something about each member that you think people would be surprised about? 

We work full-time alongside this. I’m a history teacher (Dom) and Shee’s a graphic designer.



What makes you stand out as a band/Artist?

We’ve definitely got a broad and pretty unique sound for a two-piece band and I find it really difficult to place us into a genre. I don’t think we’re Indie or Alt Rock, nor Dream Pop either. It’s a weird one, but I like that. 

What’s your favourite song to play live and why?

Definitely Swallow. That chord progression is just a joy to play, and it has a really nice energy to it throughout and it’s a very personal song. It’s quite easy as well, which helps. 

I hear you have a new single, what can you tell us about it?

Yeah, Coast is out on January 7th 2022. We’re really proud of it. I think it expands our sound even further, and includes a decent bit of social commentary that hopefully resonates with our generation. 

Talk me through the thought process of the single?

We wrote Coast as an ode to ‘coasting’ through life, being unaware about the deep-rooted issues of our time. 

It’s both upbeat and at the same time quite stark in its message, we need to pay attention to these issues, and talk about them openly without getting too tribal and political.

What was the recording process like?

We do everything ourselves, so it’s a lot of late-night sessions in my apartment attic, a lot of trial and error, and a steep learning curve. We tried to incorporate new sonic elements into the track, 

What was the biggest learning curve in writing the single?

Learning how to play the piano (abate badly). 

Would you change anything now its finished?

I always hesitate to push the vocals out in the open because they’re my own and I always feel a bit weird when dealing with them. I tend to naturally push them to the back and let the instrumentals sing. I wouldn’t necessarily change that, but it’s food for thought moving forward. 

What are your plans for the year ahead?

We’re a very young music project, and we’re really only just starting out and probing what is out there. For us, it’s about the music, the songs and the vibe/energy behind that above anything else. We want to share that of course, and to have people listen to it and enjoy it, but we’re not looking to be promoted or signed by just anybody yet. We have our identity and we want to keep it. 

We have some gigs and small festivals planned for the summer of 2022, and until then we’re going to keep writing, recording and enjoying the process. We have an EP essentially written, and we hope to release that before we start playing live.

Is there anything else you would like to share with the world?

Yeah. Have a good 2022. Cheers!