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RGM INTRODUCING – WE INTERVIEW LONDON ARTIST OBSCENITY STATE 

Hiya folks thanks for joining us in the virtual RGM lounge today, grab a brew and take a seat.

What made you decide that music is a thing for you?

I started as a painter, then an animator. Think I just needed something more expressive so it started to come out organically.

The music industry is the hardest industry in the world to progress in, How do you feel you are doing?

It’s early days, this is my first release for this project, and others coming very soon, so I wouldn’t want to comment. Best to just keep taking baby steps.

How have your songwriting skills developed over time?

I create electronic music, have sung in bands, written singer/songwriter material and lots of different classical styles. It’s important that I can keep the flow going independently, so electronic music has been a good home for me.

I’m seeing a lot of debate about females not feeling safe at music gigs, any thoughts on what we need to do to help?

Educate men to respect women. Misogynist culture seeps out everywhere, it’s depressing and dull. More security people in clubs, especially female ones, more female performers. Talking to bar staff to keep an eye out for people that look like they’re out of control. Making sure the security talk to the bar staff about what they’re seeing. Better lighting and consideration for female safety in the club/gig setups. I’ve been to places where it’s a long dark walk from the toilet to the stage at outdoor gigs. It’s priorities really, where there’s a will there’s a way but I guess profits, as a rule, come first.

As you develop as an artist and develop using socials what ways do you get new ears on your music? Any tips?

Time and money help, for online growth anyways. Ideally, you want to connect to a scene if you can that reaches your audience through small events etc. There’s a fair bit of that in London for electronic music, which has just been great in terms of making it enjoyable and creating a break from the solitary nature of electronic music creation.



What’s your thought on Spotify’s monopoly on the music industry?

It’s a sad reality but it’s a reality. I don’t expect to make money from physical sales. I just focus on developing what I’m doing and hopefully authentically connecting it with others.

Do you sign up for any conspiracy theories?

No, I read books, watch documentaries and read the news. Conspiracy theories are lazy, easy answers. You can question the nature of power intelligently without following conspiracy theories. Simplistic conspiracy theories provide a convenient distraction for people to not take democracy and informed intelligence seriously.

Did you buy anything you don’t need during the pandemic?

Too many boxsets!

What was the worst experience on stage?

They’ve all been pretty good really.

Tell us something about you that you think people would be surprised about. 

Well, that would be killing the mystery. 

What makes you stand out as an artist?

I create all my own animations using Touchdesigner, Maya, and ZBrush- pretty heavy stuff. Musically I also draw a lot from my classical compositions. I think that’s a rare approach for electronic music artists.

I hear you have new music, what can you tell us about it.

I released my first EP in late November. I have a single and then an EP coming out in late Jan/early February. Have nearly finished my second EP too. The music has a lot of drive, it’s energetic with expansive sound design and strong melodic elements. Give it a listen.

Is there anything else you would like to share with the world?

If you’re in London I gig regularly, come and see me live. You can find all the information you need on www.obscenitystate.com/

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