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RGM INTRODUCING – WE INTERVIEW LONDON ARTIST SHELDON AGWU

Introduce us to you and your musical history.

Yo! What’s up man, I started playing music from an early age, I guess from around 6. My first instrument was the guitar I always had a toy one in my hands, then I got a small acoustic one, then picked it back up again when I was in secondary school, must have been around 12 or so. I think that’s when I really started getting into the guitar and then eventually music as a whole. During that time the music department in my school was open to anyone who was interested in learning about Music, musical instruments starting up school bands, etc so I had the luxury of dabbling on other instruments such as keys, bass guitar drums, and percussion. 

Looking back now I think it’s important for musicians to have an appreciation of all kinds of instruments as this gives you a wider sense of understanding, and also improves your ears and how you hear music.

What made you decide that music is a thing for you?

I got bit by the music bug from an early age, and haven’t been able to ‘Kick the habit’ ever since! Haha 

The music industry is the hardest industry in the world to progress in, How do you feel you are doing?

I think everyone under the Sun knows how hard the music industry is, some people seem to have it a little easier than others. That’s the reality, I believe you have to make the best of the card life has dealt you, and to be honest with you, as long as I’m still enjoying making music, playing music, and learning about music, then that to me is the ultimate, industry or no industry.  

What advice would you give other artists starting out?

Well, I’m just starting out myself so don’t really think I’m one to start dishing out advice to anyone, but what I can say is that just understand that there are going to be setbacks and failures and all kinds of surprises along the journey, but embracing it all is what it’s all about, and also believing in your own voice and to never stop loving what it is that you do. 

What was the worst experience on stage?

Probably a piece of gear malfunctioning in the middle of a song, those kinds of experiences are nothing but lessons to learn from. 

If you had to describe your music in a few lines, how would you describe it? 

Soulful, emotive, and I would like to say somewhat visual. 

You’re a solo artist that does it all. What are the pros and cons of working solo on all aspects of your art?

Well, the only reason why I started working on music on my own was because of the lockdown, but I very much enjoy writing collaborating, and developing ideas with other like-minded musicians. Just that the past couple of years I’ve been able to really hone in on the aspects of music that I have been digging into and what has been influencing me. I guess that’s a pro in itself, carving out your own individual voice, but that should keep evolving over time I think.  The con would probably be not having other musicians to bounce ideas back and forth from, its very important because you might get tired of an idea you’re working on, it could become stale and having that fresh set of ears from other musicians’ input could give that song a whole new lease of life. 

This new EP, what can you tell us about it.

Seeds of Sanctum Vol 2 – I started working it on last year from my home studio as a continuation of the first one. I was getting more into writing, production, and recording just before the lockdown and started to really focus more on that. 

Talk me through the thought process of the new tune/s.

I don’t think I have a specific process, but it normally starts with being inspired to want to create something from nothing. That could be anything from a melody, a chord progression a drum groove, how you want the thing your creating to sound like, or even reading about other musicians’ lives and their stories. It’s all related, and inspiration is always the spark.



What was the recording process like?

I can’t really describe what the recording process was like specifically, but I can say that the process was influenced a lot by Hip-Hop production with elements of Jazz Improvisation and Electronica. I really think of it as an EP/ Live Beat Tape in all honesty. 

What was the biggest learning curve in writing the new tunes?

The biggest learning curve was gaining a deeper understanding of sound.

Would you change anything now it’s finished?

I don’t think a piece of music you write is ever finished, you can always keep changing it and re-shaping it how you want. The possibilities are literally endless, but there comes a point when you have to say ‘Okay let’s leave it here’ haha! 

Is there anything else you would like to share with the world?

Yh sure, follow me on Instagram @sheldonagwu for all my latest happenings. 

PRE-SAVE THE NEW EP HERE