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WE REVIEW THE NEW SINGLE FROM GREEN WIRE – CIGARETTES ON THE DANCEFLOOR

Green Wire are a band that condemns subtlety, opting instead for electrified maximalism. The indie band are crushingly loud – their music really does pin the listener back.

They’re aided in this department by two factors. The first must be some variety of monolithic dynamic compressor hidden on the outskirts of Greater Manchester. The second is vocalist Simon Stirzaker, a singer possessive of cords somehow audible even when combined with this group’s volume.

One of Green Wire’s most successful singles – ‘Upside Down, Inside Out’ – saw Stirzaker extend his voice to near breaking point in a downright thrilling performance. The song reached the iTunes Rock Charts top 15, a milestone that indicates Green Wire’s potential.

But where previous releases have flourished noisily, the band’s latest – ‘Cigarettes on the Dancefloor’ – walks a tightrope between gloriously thunderous and unflatteringly blaring, often falling off this tightrope, tumbling ungainly towards the latter side.

‘Cigarettes on the Dancefloor’ is compressed. Really compressed. Few of its intricacies are apparent without significant aural strain. Verses fair best, but the song’s chorus is overproduced and garish in presentation.

Lyrics about ‘sipping cans of red stripe’ appear to recall the type of boisterous night out that first-year university students endure – the kind that, come the beginning of their second semester, they begin to wish had never existed.

Despite this, there is an oddly likable professionalism about Green Wire. They are instrumentally tighter than many rising groups. But sadly, ‘Cigarettes on the Dancefloor’ fails to fully utilise this.